Other News from Participating Centers

What’s the future of the internet — and society?

Learning from our past and reevaluating our present, a recent World Affairs Council event opened discussion for what’s next in the world of information access.

Judith Donath, a BKC advisor, urged those in attendance to identify “cause vs. blame” when talking about the internet. Beyond external evaluation, she said a deeper question for everyone to consider is why the truth is important to their own self interest. She highlighted the contradiction of people using the internet not to search for scientific truth, but to seek validation of what they believe, or want to believe.

Is the Smart City a Good City?

An overview of smart cities and whether they can be forces for good.

“Smart cities and their protagonists are strong, and their incentives are high; the cards are stacked in their favor, including the self-logic of technological development. Nevertheless, creative resistance is not futile, as there are strong tail-winds blowing with people and earth, of dignity and inclusion.”

Read more on Medium

Imagine Otherwise: Sasha Costanza-Chock on Design Justice

How can putting marginalized people at the very center of design and technology change the world for the better? Sasha Costanza-Chock discusses their book, Design Justice.

Listen to the Ideas on Fire Podcast

“Why is Facebook drawing the line where it’s drawing the line?”

On Monday, the manager of Facebook’s Global Affairs and Governance team joined BKC's Jonathan Zittrain, Evelyn Douek, and Julie Owono to answer questions about its new Oversight Board.

Read an overview of the event on Medium

« Les Misérables », affaire classée ?

Leonard Cortana on why France’s entry for the Best International Feature Film at the Academy Awards, Les Misérables, should be inscribed in the history of French cinema:

Chrome is ditching third-party cookies because Google wants your data all to itself

Elizabeth Renieris weighed in on why we should not celebrate Google's move to remove third-party cookies from Chrome.

“They’re not really changing underlying tactics [of how they track us], they’re just channeling it all through Google,” Renieris said. “How privacy-preserving is this, actually? What’s Google’s motivation for doing this? Is it to preserve privacy? Potentially, but probably not.”

Read more from Digital Trends

Facebook’s White Paper on the Future of Online Content Regulation

evelyn douek reviews a recent white paper from Facebook on online content moderation.

“Regulation is coming, and almost everyone—including Facebook—now seems to accept this is a good thing,” says douek. “But two wrongs do not make a right, and regulators themselves should not move fast and break things. The questions and concerns that Facebook raises in this white paper are real and difficult, and regulators should take them seriously.”

Under whose thumb? Inside a Rolling Stones copyright mystery

BKC faculty associate Jennifer Jenkins on the differences between European and US copyright law when it comes to the rights of musicians:

“[In the US,] after 35 years, eligible authors can serve notice and get their rights back. At the end of the day, they give the artist a second bite of the apple.” 

Read more from Marketplace

How the Coronavirus Revealed Authoritarianism’s Fatal Flaw

Zeynep Tufekci on why China’s use of surveillance and censorship makes it harder for Xi Jinping to know what’s going on in his own country.

“It’s not clear why Xi let things spin so far out of control,” writes Tufekci. “It might be that he brushed aside concerns from his aides until it was too late, but a stronger possibility is that he did not know the crucial details.”

Read more from The Atlantic

Many Tech Experts Say Digital Disruption Will Hurt Democracy

Pew Research Center and Elon University’s Imagining the Internet Center canvassed technology experts in the summer of 2019 to gain their insights about the potential future effects of people’s use of technology on democracy.

The Week in Internet News: ISPs Sue Maine Over New Privacy Law

Protesting
privacy:
Four ISP trade groups are suing the
state of Maine for a privacy law that goes into effect this year, Ars Technica reports. Among other
things, the law supposedly violates ISP free speech rights because it limits
their ability to advertise to their customers and to offer discounts in
exchange for customers’ personal information. The Maine law requires ISPs to

New Team Members - Michael Reiss and Tanja Rüedy

New Team Members - Michael Reiss and Tanja Rüedy

Neues Video zum Medienwandel in der Schweiz

Neues Video zum Medienwandel in der Schweiz

Open Positions @ MC&I

Open Positions @ MC&I

Algorithmic decision making and online platforms - Michael Latzer @ European Commission workshop

Algorithmic decision making and online platforms - Michael Latzer @ European Commission workshop

Focusing on Digital Inequality Outcomes - Moritz Büchi @ workshop

Focusing on Digital Inequality Outcomes - Moritz Büchi @ workshop

Öffentlicher Workshop: Künstliche Intelligenz in unserem Alltag

Öffentlicher Workshop: Künstliche Intelligenz in unserem Alltag

Verkaufte Datenseele - Interview mit Michael Latzer über Algorithmen

Verkaufte Datenseele - Interview mit Michael Latzer über Algorithmen

Digital Well-Being – Moritz Büchi starting project as Digital Society Initiative Fellow

Digital Well-Being – Moritz Büchi starting project as Digital Society Initiative Fellow

Perceived Surveillance Leads to Self-Censorship – WIP-CH 2019 Reports Published

Perceived Surveillance Leads to Self-Censorship – WIP-CH 2019 Reports Published